Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Release

Behind the scenes of a Kaarakin black cockatoo release

 

This video was included in a past newsletter from Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Conservation Centre and made it on the Facebook page as well. However, as busy as I was, I completely forgot to put it on my own website! Anyway, I have plans to work on my resources pages and to include some videos as well. I would like to have my Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo back on the homepage too. June was a very busy time as I stopped paying $$$ to WordPress to host my website. As a consequence, I lost my template and 70% was restarted from scratch. I think the website is going in the right direction, though, what do you think?

To get back to the topic, I thoroughly enjoyed filming this black cockatoo release. I realised maybe the 24-70 mm lens was not the right lens in this situation as I had to stick to the fence to make sure the black curtain was shut. I should have brought the wide angle one instead. This video had 247 views on Youtube. I feel I am performing poorly on this platform but I am happy it got about 20,000 views on Facebook!

Kaarakin Black Cockatoo Release

The steps of a Kaarakin black cockatoo release are as follow:

  • Black Cockatoos which are ready to be released are separated by a black curtain
  • Black Cockatoos are caught (some people can be good at catching cockatoos or not, I guess practice makes perfect!)
  • Black Cockatoos are identified and weighted. If they seem not to be ready, they will not be release on that day
  • Black Cockatoos are placed in a pet pack
  • When all cockatoos have been caught, they are transported to the release site, which can be miles away. Some release site can even include Albany or Boddington!
  • The pet packs containing the cockatoos are placed in line. When the volunteers are ready, they open the door of the pet packs and the black cockatoos fly away to have another chance at living in the wild.

Sometimes it happens that some black cockatoos are shy and stay in the pet pack, in this case they need to be grabbed by hand and released. This is what happened in this video!

You can read more articles about black cockatoos and my volunteer work at Kaarakin here. I hope you enjoyed this behind the scenes of a black cockatoo release! You can also follow me on WordPress or receive my blog posts by email by subscribing in the footer of the website.

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