Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos in Brigadoon

A flock of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos in Brigadoon

Not long ago, I encountered another flock of Carnaby’s on my way back from Bells Rapids. At first, I thought it could be the Baudin’s black cockatoos that I had previously seen but when I finally pulled over and peered into my camera viewfinder, I saw Carnaby’s. Then the calling sound confirmed that it was effectively Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos. They were feasting in a vineyard and were flying from the vineyard to the marri trees across the road. Although at this time of the year, there is not grapes or leaves. What they were after, was the weeds/ grass etc on the ground. The few Carnaby’s perching on the vines were simply assuming the role of watchman. There were also a few perched on a tree and the younger one (I assume still a juvenile) was being playful and was swinging on a tiny branch and showing off to his mum nearby. Armed with my Canon 7DII and telephoto lens (150-600mm), I was able to take photos without interrupting anyone from the side of the road.

 

Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos fly to their breeding ground in the Wheatbelt in early Spring. The period ranges from August to January.

Although, it appears that not all Carnaby’s go to their breeding grounds in the Wheatbelt. There are a few ideas behind this:

  1. They are a few waves and not just one as there are less hollows available
  2. The Carnaby’s hens are too old too breed (which is a concern as this could mean that a significant numbers cannot reproduce anymore)
  3. They breed somewhere in the Perth Hills/ Darling Range (it was found that a couple of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos bred in an artificial nesting hollow in Mandurah)

I always enjoy seeing white tailed black cockatoos while out in the Perth Hills. Sometimes, I am lucky and I have the right camera gear with me, other times I just have to make some nice memories of my encounters. I wonder if this flock will soon be on its way to its breeding ground and where it is? Will they find their hollows again?

Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos are an endangered species. Sadly, their numbers are decreasing every year due to loss of habitats, decease (CHIP), illegal shooting, illegal poaching and vehicle/ truck strikes.

Find out more about the Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos here.

Prints available by contacting me via the contact form.

I hope you enjoy the photos like I do!

 

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